Savoriesnsweets’ Blog

Posts Tagged ‘chicken soup

Unfortunately, I’ve recently come down with what I thought was a cold.  I’ve been congested, coughing, sneezing and wheezing for a while and thanks to my great doctor, I’m finally getting better.  What’s even worse is that my mom was sick too with this same bug, only it hit her much harder with aches and pains.  The only thing I wanted to do was just stay in bed and sleep!  I knew though that we both had to drink plenty of liquids and get as much rest as possible.  I decided to make some chicken soup, since it’s the best home remedy ever.  After two days of eating this soup, I wanted a variation so I decided to try my hand at making matzoh ball soup.  Maybe I was inspired by the Passover holiday?  Maybe I wanted some more substance to my soup?  I don’t know what sparked this in me, but it was a great idea! The matzoh balls were easier to make than I thought and filled me with warmth and comfort since they were cooked in a delicious chicken broth.  This recipe is super simple and easy to make.  If you don’t like the matzoh balls, try adding some thin noodles to the soup, because, you know, chicken noodle soup is great too! This soup is just what you’ll crave when you’re feeling sick and it’s easy enough to make when you just want to stay in bed most of the day.

Kitchen Experiment: Matzoh Ball Soup

Yield:  approximately 4 quarts

  • 1 large Spanish onion, diced
  • 4-5 carrots, peeled and diced
  • 3-4 stalks of celery, diced
  • 15-20 black peppercorns
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1-2 teaspoons dried thyme
  • 8-10 stems of fresh parsley
  • 3-4 stems of fresh dill
  • 1 chicken, preferably organic
  • 1 box matzo meal
  • 2 large eggs
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil (I used canola)
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoons chicken broth
  • 1/2 head cabbage, thinly sliced
  1. Dice your onion, carrots and celery.  You should have about twice as much diced onion as you do of diced carrots and celery combined.  If not, then add more of whatever you need to achieve this ratio of 2 parts onion to 1 part carrot and celery.
  2. Prepare your sachet.  In a piece of cheesecloth (if you don’t have any you can always use gauze that doesn’t have any elastic) place the peppercorns, bay leaves, thyme, parsley and dill. Tie your sachet so that all your herbs are secure.
  3. Prepare your chicken.  Remove the gizzards and cut off any excess fat along the tail.  Rinse the chicken until the water runs clear, taking care to remove any internal organs that remain.
  4. In a large 6 quart pot over low, add your onion, carrots and celery and add the chicken.  (If you like the gizzards and neck, do add them!  I did and they gave a wonderful richness to the soup.)
  5. Add enough water to the pot to cover the vegetables and the chicken and add your sachet.
  6. Now walk away! Do not stir, turn or disturb this pot! Also, be sure you never have a rolling boil.  If you do see vigorous boiling about to occur, reduce your heat. Come back in about 40 min (or an hour) and you will see some foam rising to the top.  Gently skim this from the top without disturbing the rest of the contents.
  7. Repeat the skimming process every 30 minutes or so for the next hour.
  8. Meanwhile, prepare the matzo balls.  In a large bowl, beat together the eggs, oil, salt and matzo meal. Add broth (I used broth from the pot) and mix until uniform.  Refrigerate for about 30 minutes.
  9. At this point your soup has been gently simmering away for about 2 hours.  Remove your chicken, taking care to retrieve any parts that might be falling off.  Shred all the meat of your chicken and return it to the pot.
  10. Add the cabbage and cook until tender.  (If you’re using noodles, add them at this point and cook until tender.) If you’re preparing the matzo balls, remove them from the refrigerator and form them into balls.  Be aware that they will swell when cooking!
  11. Into a smaller pot, ladle enough broth so that it will cover the matzo balls. Cover the pot and bring the broth to a boil.
  12. Add the matzo balls and cook for about 30 minutes.
  13. To serve, ladle soup and 2 matzo balls into a large bowl.  Top with some freshly chopped dill.

Matzo ball soup

This soup is delicious and satisfying! For those or you more familiar with matzo ball soup, this recipe for the matzo balls are basically the recipe on the back of the box only I cooked them in broth instead of water.  Of course, I have no idea if these are considered hard or soft and I wasn’t even aware of this debate until recently.  I just know my soup was good and easy enough to make when I felt super sick!

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